AEWORLDMAP.COM (over 2,400 posts)

A research project from the Architectural Engineering program at The University of Texas at Austin – featuring contemporary architecture, engineering and construction around the world.

Grace Farms – New Canaan, Connecticut

leave a comment »

Grace-Farms-SANAA-1208-c-Dean-Kaufman image_5
graphics_2 graphics_3
[1, 2, 3, 4]

Building: Grace Farms
Address: 65 Lukes Wood Rd, New Canaan, CT 06840, United States
Architect: SANAA
Size: 60,000 sq.ft.
Completed: 2015
Executive Architect: Handel Architects LLP
Landscape Architect: OLIN
HVAC, MEP engineer and lighting: Buro Happold
Project Manager: Paratus Group
Structural Engineer: Robert Silman Associates
Civil Engineer: McChord Engineering
Sustainability Consultant: Transsolar
Acoustics: Harvey Marshall Berling Associates, Nagata Acoustics

AE Interest: Nestled amid 75 acres of meadows, woods, wetlands and lakes [1]; closed loop geothermal cooling system that greatly reduced energy use compared to traditional outdoor chillers; below ground external tunnels to bring outdoor air into the center [3]; 77 of Grace Farms’ 80 acres are to remain in perpetuity as open meadows, woods, wetlands, and ponds [4].
Article: a1, a2, a3, a4.

 

 

Advertisements

Written by shijunxu

April 19, 2018 at 1:49 pm

Posted in Built

Beirut Terraces – Beirut, Lebanon

leave a comment »

Beirut_Terraces_1 Beirut_Terraces_3Beirut_Terraces_2

[123]
Building Name: Beirut Terraces
Address: Plot 1801 and Plot 1802, Block 18, Beirut Central District, Lebanon
Completion: 2016
Architect: Herzog and de Meuron
Executive Architect: Khatib & Alami
Project Architects: Tobias Winkelmann, Ursula Hürzeler
Planning Engineer: Hill International
Building Dimensions: Base: 216 x 216ft, Tower: 53,70m x 53,70m / 177 x 177ft
Height: 392ft

AE Interests: Five principles define the project: layers and terraces, inside and outside, vegetation, views and privacy, light and identity; The structure is carried by the core and a regular column-grid that spans up to 14.7 meters; [1] 160 floors of vertical layering.

Article: a1, a2.

(Edited March 2018 by Shijun Xu)

Written by Sean Franks

March 28, 2018 at 11:18 am

Posted in Under Construction

Gallery Yeh – Seoul, Korea

leave a comment »

Gallery Yeh-2  Gallery Yeh-1 
[1,
 2]
Building: Gallery Yeh
Location: 532-9 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, South Korea
Architect: Unsangdong Architect
Construction: GuJin Industrial Development Co.Ltd
Structural Design: Central Structural Engineer’s Office
Electrical Design: Jikhwa Engineering Co., Ltd.
Supervision: Ung-dong Architect Office
Gross Floor Area: 21475 sq.ft.
Building Area: 3580 sq.ft
Site Area: 6108 sq.ft
Completed: 2005

AE Interests: AR Award for Emerging Architecture in 2007 [2]; Architectural concept of “Skinscape”, “spatialization of Skin”, generating multiple layers hidden behind the single layer of the architectural skin, Reinforced concrete structure (RC structure) [3]; tall angular exterior concrete walls are braced back to the main tower via steel beams.

Article: a1, a2, a3, a4, a5.

 

Written by shijunxu

February 27, 2018 at 11:27 pm

Posted in Built

Stanford University Central Energy Facility – Palo Alto, California

leave a comment »

matthew-anderson-stanford-university-central-energy-facility-zgf-architects-industrial-architecture-california-usa_dezeen_1568_10  P40381_00_N19_printmedium Sustainability_Diagram.jpg
[1,2,3]
Building: Stanford University Central Energy Facility
Location: Palo Alto, California, USA
Design Architects: ZGF Architects
Construction Contractor: The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
MEP Engineers:  AEI Consulting Engineers
Civil Engineer: BKF Engineers
Structural Engineer: Rutherford + Chekene
Landscape Architect: Tom Leader Studio
Size: 125600sq.ft.
Completed: 2015
Cost: $485 million

AE Interests: Stanford Energy System Innovation (SESI) initiative will eliminate 150,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions; reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 68%; fossil fuel use by 65%, and campus-wide water use by 15% [1];  key components include: heat recovery chiller system, thermal energy water storage tanks, high voltage substation for electricity which are all completely powered by electricity from renewable resources; LED lighting, open air floor plan for cross breezes; chilled beam systems; ceiling panels absorb heat with energy absorbing filler [2].

Articles: [1,2]

 

 

Written by Chloe Jones

December 8, 2017 at 10:20 am

Posted in Built

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Inouye Regional Center – Honolulu, Hawaii

leave a comment »

PICUTRE 4.jpg  PICTURE 3.jpg  HPB_Winter 2018_NOAA_p10
[1,2,3]

Building: Inouye Regional Center
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii, USA
Original Architect: Albert Kahn
Local Architect: Ferraro Choi
Architect: HOK
Structural Engineer: SOHA Engineers
MEP: WSP Flack + Kurtz
Civil Engineer: Kennedy Jenks
Size: 350,000 sq.ft.
Completed: January 2014
Cost: $157 million

AE Interests: LEED Gold, AIA/COTE Top Ten Green Projects Award [3]; recycled and adaptive reuse of airplane hangars [1]; includes a revolutionary Passive Cooling Unit (PCU) system (which pulls cool water from a 1,300-foot deep well under the sea bed and pumps it up into roof top cooling coils) [2], gray and rain water system, and a skylight diffuser system [2]; roofs and central addition capture rainwater and distribute it to bioswales; chilled beams [2].

Articles: [1,2,3]

 

Written by Chloe Jones

December 8, 2017 at 10:19 am

Posted in Built

The J. Craig Venter Institute – La Jolla, California

leave a comment »

JCVI outside  JCVI inside  JCVI Operation  JCVI solar

[1, 2, 3, 4]

Project: The J. Craig Venter Institute
Location: La Jolla, California
Address: 4120 Capricorn Lane 92037
Architect: ZGF Architects
MEP Engineer: Integral Group and PE Innovations
Structural Engineer: KPFF Consulting Engineers
Completed: November 2013
Size: 44,607 SF

AE Interest: LEED Platinum certified in 2016 and net zero energy footprint – the first biology laboratory in the country to achieve both, utilizes captured stormwater for reuse in toilets and cooling towers, facility is pre-piped to allow the use of regional reuse water, two arrays of photovoltaic surfaces on the roof serve as both an energy source and shading structure, internal and external loads are controlled by heating and cooling via induction beams, uses two civil cisterns and one storage tank for rainwater storage, uses a 50,000 gallon Thermal Energy System for heat generation, no natural gas lines connected to it, unfinished wood was used to eliminate harmful chemical finishes and Portland Type II concrete was used to reflect heat, the budget was reduced by 70% but the building maintained its functionality and purpose, 100% collection and reuse of on-site rainwater.

Source: [1]

Written by Griffin Powell

December 7, 2017 at 1:32 pm

Posted in Built

H-E-B at Mueller – Austin, Texas

leave a comment »

HEB outside  HEB inside  HEB elevations  HEB plan

[1, 2, 3, 4]

Project: H-E-B at Mueller
Location: Austin, Texas
Address: 1801 E 51st 78723
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects
Associate Architect: Selser Schaefer Architects
MEP Engineer: Arup
Structural Engineer: Beicker Consultants, LLC
Completed: July 2013
Size: 83,587 SF

AE Interest: LEED Gold certified in 2014, recognized by American Institute of Architects as one of the top 10 most sustainable architecture projects of 2016, canopy has same ceramic coating as space shuttles to reflect heat, 600 rooftop solar panels produce 200,000 kWh/year which provides enough power to light the entire store, rain gardens act as a natural filtration system capturing runoff from the parking lot (manages 100% of stormwater), slashed its energy and water use by 57% over the grocery store national median, daylighting integrated with computer automated LED lighting, uses destratification fans and chilled beams to regulate comfort, uses the City of Austin’s reclaimed water system (1/4 the cost of portable water) which accounts for 82% of the store’s water consumption, front vestibule allows heating and cooling systems to work less.

Source: [1,2]

Written by Griffin Powell

December 7, 2017 at 1:32 pm

Posted in Built