AEWORLDMAP.COM (2,110 posts)

A research project from the Architectural Engineering program at The University of Texas at Austin – featuring contemporary architecture, engineering and construction around the world.

Stanford University Central Energy Facility – Palo Alto, California

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matthew-anderson-stanford-university-central-energy-facility-zgf-architects-industrial-architecture-california-usa_dezeen_1568_10  P40381_00_N19_printmedium
Sustainability_Diagram.jpg
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Building: Stanford University Central Energy Facility
Location: Palo Alto, California, USA
Design Architects: ZGF Architects
Construction Contractor: The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
MEP Engineers:  AEI Consulting Engineers
Civil Engineer: BKF Engineers
Structural Engineer: Rutherford + Chekene
Landscape Architect: Tom Leader Studio
Size: 125600sq.ft.
Completed: 2015
Cost: $485 million

AE Interests: Stanford Energy System Innovation (SESI) initiative will eliminate 150,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions; reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 68%; fossil fuel use by 65%, and campus-wide water use by 15% [1];  key components include: heat recovery chiller system, thermal energy water storage tanks, high voltage substation for electricity which are all completely powered by electricity from renewable resources; LED lighting, open air floor plan for cross breezes; chilled beam systems; ceiling panels absorb heat with energy absorbing filler [2].

Articles: [1,2]

 

 

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Written by Chloe Jones

December 8, 2017 at 10:20 am

Posted in Built

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Inouye Regional Center – Honolulu, Hawaii

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PICUTRE 4.jpg  PICTURE 3.jpg  HPB_Winter 2018_NOAA_p10
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Building: Inouye Regional Center
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii, USA
Original Architect: Albert Kahn
Local Architect: Ferraro Choi
Architect: HOK
Structural Engineer: SOHA Engineers
MEP: WSP Flack + Kurtz
Civil Engineer: Kennedy Jenks
Size: 350,000 sq.ft.
Completed: January 2014
Cost: $157 million

AE Interests: LEED Gold, AIA/COTE Top Ten Green Projects Award [3]; recycled and adaptive reuse of airplane hangars [1]; includes a revolutionary Passive Cooling Unit (PCU) system (which pulls cool water from a 1,300-foot deep well under the sea bed and pumps it up into roof top cooling coils) [2], gray and rain water system, and a skylight diffuser system [2]; roofs and central addition capture rainwater and distribute it to bioswales; chilled beams [2].

Articles: [1,2,3]

 

Written by Chloe Jones

December 8, 2017 at 10:19 am

Posted in Built

The J. Craig Venter Institute – La Jolla, California

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JCVI outside  JCVI inside  JCVI Operation  JCVI solar

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Project: The J. Craig Venter Institute
Location: La Jolla, California
Address: 4120 Capricorn Lane 92037
Architect: ZGF Architects
MEP Engineer: Integral Group and PE Innovations
Structural Engineer: KPFF Consulting Engineers
Completed: November 2013
Size: 44,607 SF

AE Interest: LEED Platinum certified in 2016 and net zero energy footprint – the first biology laboratory in the country to achieve both, utilizes captured stormwater for reuse in toilets and cooling towers, facility is pre-piped to allow the use of regional reuse water, two arrays of photovoltaic surfaces on the roof serve as both an energy source and shading structure, internal and external loads are controlled by heating and cooling via induction beams, uses two civil cisterns and one storage tank for rainwater storage, uses a 50,000 gallon Thermal Energy System for heat generation, no natural gas lines connected to it, unfinished wood was used to eliminate harmful chemical finishes and Portland Type II concrete was used to reflect heat, the budget was reduced by 70% but the building maintained its functionality and purpose, 100% collection and reuse of on-site rainwater.

Source: [1]

Written by Griffin Powell

December 7, 2017 at 1:32 pm

Posted in Built

H-E-B at Mueller – Austin, Texas

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HEB outside  HEB inside  HEB elevations  HEB plan

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Project: H-E-B at Mueller
Location: Austin, Texas
Address: 1801 E 51st 78723
Architect: Lake|Flato Architects
Associate Architect: Selser Schaefer Architects
MEP Engineer: Arup
Structural Engineer: Beicker Consultants, LLC
Completed: July 2013
Size: 83,587 SF

AE Interest: LEED Gold certified in 2014, recognized by American Institute of Architects as one of the top 10 most sustainable architecture projects of 2016, canopy has same ceramic coating as space shuttles to reflect heat, 600 rooftop solar panels produce 200,000 kWh/year which provides enough power to light the entire store, rain gardens act as a natural filtration system capturing runoff from the parking lot (manages 100% of stormwater), slashed its energy and water use by 57% over the grocery store national median, daylighting integrated with computer automated LED lighting, uses destratification fans and chilled beams to regulate comfort, uses the City of Austin’s reclaimed water system (1/4 the cost of portable water) which accounts for 82% of the store’s water consumption, front vestibule allows heating and cooling systems to work less.

Source: [1,2]

Written by Griffin Powell

December 7, 2017 at 1:32 pm

Posted in Built

Sweetwater Spectrum Community – Sonoma, California

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SWS_06  SWS_01

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Project: Sweetwater Spectrum Community
Location: 369 5th St W,Sonoma, CA 95476
Architect: Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects
Client: Sweetwater Spectrum, Inc.
Structural Engineer: Structural Design Group
Lanscape Architect: Roche + Roche Lanscape Architecture
MEP: Timmons Design Engineers
Civil Engineer: Adobe Associates, Inc.
Geotechnical Engineer: Miller Pacific Engineering Group
Size: 16,315 sf
Completed: January 2013
Cost: $6,884,896.00

AE Interest: The Sweetwater Spectrum is a community of supportive housing for adults with autism. It is designed to LEED-NC 2009 Gold Level. This low-carbon community is designed to reduce sensory stimulation to connect to the natural world, and to create safe, comfortable and predictable domestic environments. The buildings are oriented to maximize solar benefit and to create a variety of outdoor spaces for activities and quiet retreat. Also, the high performance envelope, building-integrated photovoltaic and solar thermal panels reduce energy consumption by 88% from baseline.[a]

Source: [a]

Written by Amanda Sanchez

December 7, 2017 at 12:35 pm

Posted in Built

Atlas Hoi An Hotel – Hội An, Vietnam

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468  TCT-Issue-19-Res-Your-Head-ATLAS-HOTEL-Hoi-An 

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Project: Atlas Hoi An Hotel
Location: 30 Dao Duy Tu, Hoi An, Quang Nam, Vietnam
Architect: VTN Architects
Client: Danh Co., Ltd
Interior Design: Vo Trong Nghia Architects
Size: 1,348 sm
GFA: 3,115 sm
Completed: 2016

AE Interest: Because the site is so complex, each guest room is shorter and wider that a regular hotel room. However, this is an opportunity for guests to engage in the greenery surrounding the building, not only in the bedroom but also in the bathroom. By installing more than 100 cantilevering concrete planters, the greenery appears at all the façades balconies, along the narrow corridors and rooftop as well. The main material for the façade is the local sandstone. This greenery not only provides solar shading but also allows cooler air to ventilate the spaces. [a]

Source: [a]

Written by Amanda Sanchez

December 7, 2017 at 12:28 pm

Posted in Built

Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation – Berkeley, CA

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Project: Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation
Location: University of California, Berkeley, College of Engineering
Architect: Leddy Matum Stacy Architects
Structural Engineer: Forell/Elsesser
Landscape Architect: Cliff Lowe Associates
MEP: Integral Group Engineers
Contractor and Construction Management: Hathaway Dinwiddie
Size: 24,000 sf
Completed: September 2015
Cost: $23.4 million

AE Interest: Designed to exceed AIA 2030 Commitment to consume 90% less energy than national median for university buildings [b], 58% of required energy comes from roof top photovoltaic array, east-west orientation and simple massing help give 100% of instructional spaces & 85% of regularly occupied spaces above basement day-lighting and natural ventilation [a], roof diverts rainwater to bioswales/rain gardens which filter and divert rainwater (50% less water used on drought-tolerant landscape) [a, c], Energy Star-rated cool roofing [a], utilizes surplus heated and cooled water from adjacent building for conditioning [a], LEED Platinum Certified [c].

Sources: [a, b, c]

Written by Sammy Jarrar

December 6, 2017 at 12:39 pm

Posted in Built